Who wants some eyeball?

10 12 2008

Its time to claim the eyeballs!

The roast pig we are serving up on 12/20/08 is sure to offer a bonanza of meat and crispy skin.  However, there are several parts of the pig’s anatomy that can only be savored by a few.  Therefore, those need to be claimed ahead of time.

There are only two eyeballs on this pig, and they really can’t be shared.  Its like popping a jaw breaker in your mouth. To be honest, I’m not really that interested. However, whoever claims an eyeball also needs to agree to be featured in a video of you enjoying a taste explosion. C’mon now, don’t be squeamish. I once convinced my daughter, Isabel, to eat a fish eye. I’m not really sure how I got her to eat it since the usual enticements like encouragement, threats, bribes, or outright deception just don’t seem to work anymore on the kids. Yet, she popped it in and crunched. She didn’t say it was good, and she didn’t say it was bad – its a texture thing, you know?

However, I am willing to share the brain. Anyone?  Anyone?

While you’re thinking about it, take a look at this Man vs. Wild video.  Man, I love Bear Grylls.

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Preparing for the pig roast

17 11 2008
Lechon plate

Lechon plate

I thought I would continue to get you excited about the upcoming pig roast by providing you with a picture of a typical Lechon Asado plate.  The lechón (or roast pig for you gringos) is a typical Puerto Rican dish, usually served at large gatherings.  Common side dishes (for me, anyway) would include yellow rice and pigeon peas (arroz con gandules), tostones (or fried plantains), and amarillos (literally translated as “yellows,” these are baked sweet plantains). No green stuff here except for in the marinade.

The lechón is the Puerto Rican version of pulled pork. The only difference, really, is in the marinade. Whereas your typical barbecue pulled pork would be marinated with a vinegar or apple cider base, the Puerto Rican version is marinated with a “mojo” (pronounced moho).  My mojo will consist of bitter orange, olive oil, garlic (enough to choke a brood of vampires), fresh oregano, salt, and pepper. Pretty simple, yet incredibly flavorful.  What is bitter orange, you might ask? Well, I can’t find it around here. Although it is pretty common in the tropics, even my specialty grocer doesn’t carry this particular orange.  Here, it is commonly referred to as a Seville orange.  However, you can make a semblance of the bitter orange by combining equal parts of regular orange juice and lime juice.  It will work just fine for me.

By the time this pig is done cooking, it will just completely fall apart. Get your appetites ready.





First annual pig roast

10 11 2008

pig

For those of you who have followed my blog before, please ignore the fact that I haven’t written a thing in quite some time. That’s what happens when you own two businesses, home-school three children, and are involved in law suits. Oh, well. Nothing gets my mind off of those things better than thinking of…food! (what did you think I was thinking about?)

I have been Jonesing for some well-made, crispy and tasty pork skin (chicharrón to you gringos). About the only way to get it is to make it yourself. So, that got me thinking: I should roast my own pig homer(mmm – pig).  Now, this isn’t such an easy undertaking, nor will it be cheap. And I’m certainly not going to roast a 100lb. pig just to get some skin. So, why not turn this into a huge shindig and invite my closest friends and family to enjoy it with me? Thus, our first annual pig roast!

As this process progresses, I will update this blog to show you how we’re putting this together. I’ve already spoken to several people about the idea and they are extremely excited, especially my mom. In fact, one of my friends even offered to provide the pig (sweet).  For those of you who are invited, you will be receiving regular e-mail updates. These updates will probably point back to this blog to give you further details and continue to whet your appetites.

This year I’ve decided to roast the pig “a-la-isla.” That’s what I call it, anyway. It will be done Puerto Rican style with many common Latin side dishes. I will be cooking the pig on an above-ground pit, somewhat like a concrete block caja-china.” If this goes well (and the stress isn’t too horrendous), subsequent years will feature the same pig, but be cooked in different styles: Thai, barbecue, Hawaiian, etc.

Keep watchin’,’cause I think this is gonna be good!